Pupil Premium


What is Pupil Premium?

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The Pupil Premium was introduced in April 2011. It is additional funding provided by the
Department for Education to close the attainment gap between pupils from low income families and their peers. It is allocated to schools with pupils on roll who are known to have been eligible for Free School Meals (FSM) at any time in the last six years, are Children Looked After (in the care of the Local Authority) or who have a parent serving in the Armed Services.

Principles

  • We organise teaching and learning at Springwell Learning Community in order to meet the needs of all  children in the best way.
  • We ensure that appropriate provision is made for children who belong to vulnerable groups and that socially disadvantaged children have their needs adequately assessed and met.
  • We recognise that not all children who receive free school meals will be socially disadvantaged and we also recognise that not all children that are disadvantaged have free school meals. We allocate Pupil Premium funding to support any child
    the school has identified as being socially disadvantaged and should be making better progress.
  • We will allocate Pupil Premium funding after a needs analysis to identify priority groups and individuals.

 Special Academy 2015-16 Allocation and Impact

Alternative Academy 2015-16 Allocation and Impact

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Pupil Premium Strategy Statement and Action Plan 2016-2017

 


Sports Premium

What is the Sports Premium?

The government is providing all schools with additional funding to improve the provision of Physical Education (PE) and Sport in schools. This funding is ring-fenced which means it can only be used for its specified purpose.

How are we using the Sports Premium?

As part of our drive to improve PE we aim to ensure that the Sports Premium is spent effectively to support teachers so that there is increased participation in PE and school sport so that all pupils develop a healthy lifestyle and reach the performance levels they are capable of. Sport is an important part of our school curriculum and excellence and enjoyment in sport participation, alongside strong cultural opportunities, supports our pupil’s academic progress, social skills and well being.

For 2016/17 Springwell Learning Community will receive an allocation of £9,635.

 

What is the impact of this additional funding and how does it support academic performance?

Our extra-curricular sports provision helps us to improve;

  • Behaviour
  • Attendance/punctuality
  • Attitudes
  • Achievement in class

Pupils love to participate in sports clubs and they are used effectively as a motivational tool to improve pupil performance.

Meanwhile – click here to access our PE Blog to find out what we’ve been up to recently! Go Springwell!

 The Literacy and Numeracy Catch Up Premium

At Springwell Learning Community we are striving to ensure that all pupils are given every opportunity to succeed and achieve their full potential.

The literacy and numeracy catch-up premium gives schools additional funding to support year 7 pupils who did not achieve the expected standard in reading or maths at the end of Key Stage 2

The catch-up premium is spent in an integrated and targeted way, to ensure that pupils receive the opportunity for additional support and access to all learning opportunities which will enhance their literacy and numeracy.

For the current academic year (2016/17) the allocation of funds to Springwell Learning Community was £1,650.

We assess the individual needs of each of the pupils who attract the year 7 catch-up premium and decide the best way to use the funding.

Planned spend of the current academic year’s allocation

  • Big maths numeracy programme;
  • A reading intervention programme;
  • A handwriting intervention programme;
  • Small group intensive support on reading;
  • 1:1 LSA support and intervention with literacy and numeracy throughout the curriculum;
  • The purchase of texts and resources, including apps for small, specifically focused classes in English and Mathematics.
  • The purchase of online subscriptions to improve engagement and raise attainment in numeracy and literacy.
  • Lexia license purchased for pupils with dyslexia.
  • Further training for wider, dispersed support staff in reading and maths interventions.

The impact of the interventions are tracked through six progress captures throughout the year. Further intervention will be put in place following rigorous analysis of this data.